English Department

Academic Programs

Bachelor of Arts

English Major (ENG) (Non-Teacher Licensure), BA

REQUIREMENTS

Liberal Arts: 53 Hours

Students must take one year (at least 6 hours) of modern foreign language for global literacy. 

Major: 42 Hours

  • ENG 231 - English Studies  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 251 - British Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 252 - British Literature Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 271 - American Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 272 - American Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 322 - Systems of English Grammar  Credit Hours: 3 (or passing a departmental grammar and editing proficiency test)
  • ENG 281 - Advanced Composition  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 422 - Nature and History of Language  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 451 - Senior Project  Credit Hours: 0,1
  • 12 additional hours of English electives numbered 250 or above (9 hours if ENG 322 is elected above)
  • one additional year (6-8 hours) of modern foreign language

Minor: 18 Hours

Remaining Bible/Electives: 15 Hours

TOTAL HOURS: 128

English Major (ENGC) (Teacher Licensure), BA

REQUIREMENTS

Liberal Arts: 44 Hours

EDFD 203, required in place of PSY 201, is counted below in the hours required for certification.

The 6-hour global literacy requirement is satisfied by one year of modern foreign language, counted below in the major. POLS 205 and MATH 151 are required.

Major: 40 Hours

  • ENG 231 - English Studies  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 251 - British Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 252 - British Literature Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 271 - American Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 272 - American Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 281 - Advanced Composition  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 322 - Systems of English Grammar  Credit Hours 3
  • ENG 420 - Literature for Adolescents  Credit Hours 3
  • ENG 422 - Nature and History of Language  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 451 - Senior Project  Credit Hours: 0,1
  • 6 additional hours of English electives numbered 250 or above
  • one year (6-8 hours) of modern foreign language

Licensure: 31 Hours

Consult the College of Education catalog section for additional information.

  • EDFD 200 - Chalk / Wire ePortfolio 
  • EDFD 202 - The Teaching Profession and Technology - Field Experience I Credit Hours: 3
  • EDFD 203 - Child and Adolescent Development  Credit Hours: 3
  • EDFD 311 - Principles of Learning and Teaching  Credit Hours: 3
  • RDNG 415 - Interdisciplinary Literacy  Credit Hours: 3
  • SEED 314 - Classroom Management & Assessment - Field Experience II  Credit Hours: 2
  • SEED 417 - Classroom Assessment  Credit Hours: 2
  • SEED 423 - Teaching English  Credit Hours: 3
  • SEED 451 - Supervised Teaching: Secondary 7-12  Credit Hours: 8-12
  • SEED 480 - Professional Educator-Secondary  Credit Hours: 2
  • SPED 418 - Educating the Child wiht Exceptionalities: Secondary  Credit Hours: 2

Note: Students seeking teaching licensure must follow eligibility criteria for admission and retention listed in the Cannon-Clary College of Education section of the undergraduate catalog.

Minor: 18 Hours

A minor of 18 hours is required for this major.  Students who have 18 hours in Bible will have met this requirement.

Remaining Bible/Electives: 6 Hours

Bible is not required during the supervised teaching semester. See Bible Class Enrollment policy here.

TOTAL HOURS: 139

Note: For high school teachers of English, a modern foreign language minor or second teaching field is very useful.  Since high school teachers of English are often expected to coach debate, to supervise student publications, or to produce plays, the following courses are also desirable electives: COMM 151 and COMM 263, COMM 242 and COMM 243, and THEA 131.

Non-Degree

English as a Second Language Field

REQUIREMENTS: 24 Hours

Students certifying to teach in a major field who wish to add English as a second field must complete 24 hours of English, including:

  • ENG 251 - British Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 252 - British Literature Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 271 - American Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 272 - American Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 281 - Advanced Composition  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 322 - Systems of English Grammar  Credit Hours 3
  • 6 hours of English electives numbered 201 or above (ENG 211 excluded)

English Minor

REQUIREMENTS

18 hours, including:

  • ENG 111 - Composition I or ENG 113 Composition I and Grammar  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 201 - World Literature I or ENG 202 - World Literature II  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 211 - Composition II  Credit Hours: 3
  • 9 hours of upper-level English courses

Linguistics Minor

REQUIREMENTS

18 hours, including:

One year of any modern foreign language and

  • COMM 318 - Linguistics  Credit Hours: 3
  • CSD 290 - Phonetics  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 422 - Nature and History of Language  Credit Hours: 3

Three hours selected from:

  • ENG 322 - Systems of English Grammar  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 370 - Old and Middle English Literature  Credit Hours: 3
  • TESL 439 - Second Language Acquisition  Credit Hours: 3

Teaching English as a Second Language Field

See the TESL curriculum in the College of Education course listings.

Writing Minor

Writing Minor for Non-English Majors

REQUIREMENTS

18 hours, including:

  • ENG 111 - Composition I or ENG 113 Composition I and Grammar  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 211 - Composition II  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 281 - Advanced Composition  Credit Hours: 3

  9 hours, selected from:

  • ENG 291 - Business and Professional Writing  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 312 - Writing Poetry  Credit Hours: 3 
  • ENG 313 - Writing Fiction  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 314 - Script Writing for Television and Film  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 322 - Systems of English Grammar  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 351 - Introduction to Publishing  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 355 - Advanced Screenwriting for Film  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 391 - Writing Nonfiction  Credit Hours: 3

Writing Minor for English Majors

REQUIREMENTS

18 hours, including:

  • ENG 111 - Composition I or ENG 113 Composition I and Grammar  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 211 - Composition II  Credit Hours: 3

12 hours, selected from:

  • ENG 291 - Business and Professional Writing  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 312 - Writing Poetry  Credit Hours: 3 
  • ENG 313 - Writing Fiction  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 314 - Script Writing for Television and Film  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 351 - Introduction to Publishing  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 355 - Advanced Screenwriting for Film  Credit Hours: 3
  • ENG 391 - Writing Nonfiction  Credit Hours: 3
 

Film Minor

REQUIREMENTS

18 hours:

  • ENG 314 - Scriptwriting for Television and Film  Credit Hours: 3 (fall)
  • ENG 355 - Advanced Screenwriting  Credit Hours: 3 (spring)
  • ENG 390 - Film as Literature  Credit Hours: 3 fall (fall)
  • COMM 235 - Audio Production and Recording  Credit Hours: 3 (fall and spring)
  • COMM 253 - Video Production  Credit Hours: 3 (fall and spring)
  • COMM 314 - Film Production  Credit Hours: 3 (spring)

Majors in Electronic Media Production should consult with your Dept. Chair.

Course Descriptions

100. BASIC ENGLISH. (3) Fall, Spring. Grammar and composition skills. Required for students who have no credit in college composition and who scored 18 or below on the ACT English examination (440 or below on the SAT critical reading examination). This course does not count as college credit, but is included in GPA calculations and counts toward athletic eligibility and financial aid eligibility.




111. COMPOSITION I. (3) Fall, Spring. College-level essay writing. Library orientation and grammar review. A grade of C or higher is required to be eligible for ENG 211. Prerequisites: ENG 100, or 19 or above on the ACT English examination, or 450 or above on the SAT critical reading examination, or 80 or above on the ACT COMPASS Writing Skills exam.

113. COMPOSITION I AND GRAMMAR. (3) Fall, Spring. College-level essay writing and grammar review. A grade of C or higher is required to be eligible for ENG 211. Library orientation. Designed especially for licensure majors. Prerequisites: ENG 100, or 19 or above on the ACT English exam, or 450 or above on the SAT critical reading examination.




201. WORLD LITERATURE I. (3) Fall, Spring. Writers from ancient times through the Renaissance whose ideas are representative of concepts, movements, or creative expressions that have had significant impact upon western culture.


202. WORLD LITERATURE II. (3) Fall, Spring. Writers from the Neoclassic Age to the present whose ideas are representative of concepts, movements, or creative expressions that have had significant impact upon western culture.


211. COMPOSITION II. (3) Fall, Spring. Builds on skills developed in Composition I with emphasis on critical reading, thinking, and writing. Research paper required. A grade of C or higher is required to meet the English proficiency standard of the university's graduation requirements. Prerequisite(s): Earning a grade of C or higher in ENG 111 or 113.


231. ENGLISH STUDIES. (3) Spring. An overview of literary studies, including history, genre, terminology, research methods, critical approaches, and film as literature. l

251. BRITISH LITERATURE I. (3, 3) Fall, Spring. Developments and significance of British literature, with its historical, social, and philosophical backgrounds from the beginning through the 18th century.


252. BRITISH LITERATURE II. (3, 3) Fall, Spring. Developments and significance of British literature, with its historical, social, and philosophical backgrounds from the from the 19th century to the present.


271.  AMERICAN LITERATURE I. (3, 3) Fall. Developments and significance of American literature, with its historical, social, and philosophical backgrounds from the beginning to the Civil War.


272.  AMERICAN LITERATURE II. (3, 3) Spring. Developments and significance of American literature, with its historical, social, and philosophical backgrounds from the mid-19th century to the present.


281. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. (3) Fall, Spring. Advanced development and polishing skills in writing, particularly expository and argumentative prose.
 Prerequisite: ENG 211.

285. TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH. (3) Summer. Students will learn the purpose of research and its value to various discipline; will learn and practice finding appropriate sources of research for a given research question; and will learn research models to include identifying a research topic, narrowing the research question, conducting and writing a review of the literature on the topic/question selected, formulating hypotheses, developing the research design, collecting data, analyzing data, and drawing conclusions. Students will also learn to write in appropriate reporting formats. This course serves as the basis for the research internship. Course may be repeated for up to 6 hours credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing, 2.75 minimum GPA. Student must be enrolled as a McNair Scholar.

291. BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING. (3) Fall of even years. For students in all disciplines. Introduction to the theory and practices of composition in professional fields. Topics include correspondence, job search, electronic media, and report writing and presentations based on investigation of real-life problems in business and organizations.

312. WRITING POETRY. (3) Spring of odd years. Emphasizes the production of poetry in a workshop format.




313. WRITING FICTION. (3) Spring of even years. Emphasizes the production of prose fiction in a workshop format.




314. SCRIPT WRITING FOR TELEVISION AND FILM. (3) Fall of even years. The analysis and drafting of scripts for advertising, television, and narrative film, in a workshop format.

322. SYSTEMS OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR. (3) Fall. Designed particularly for students who plan to teach English. Principles of traditional English grammar, comparative grammars, and dialect awareness.

351. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLISHING. (3) Summer with sufficient enrollment. An overview of book publishing with an emphasis on the developments in digital production. Intended to provide broad professional knowledge in manuscript evaluation, editing, design, marketing, and management as well as financial and legal issues related to the industry. Prerequisite: ENG with a C or higher.

355. ADVANCED SCREENWRITING FOR FILM. (3) Fall of odd years. This course teaches students how to develop the fundamental elements of a feature-film screenplay. Students will produce a short-film screenplay based on the ideas presented within the feature-length screenplay. Prerequisite: ENG 314.

360. AMERICAN POETRY. (3) Summer with sufficient demand. Poets studied in detail vary from year to year. May be repeated with the consent of the department chair.




367. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. (0-6) Offered with approval of the department chair. See Cooperative Education catalog section.




370. OLD AND MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE. (3) Fall of even years. British literature with emphasis on Chaucer.

371. SHAKESPEARE. (3) Spring. Spring of odd years. Shakespeare's development as a dramatic artist with close study of the texts of the comedies, tragedies, histories, and sonnets, along with discussion of the classic and recent film adaptations of the plays.

380. RENAISSANCE AND 17th CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE. (3) Fall of odd years. Excluding Shakespeare, study of major British writers of the period, including sonneteers, dramatists, Spenser, Donne, and Milton.




390. FILM AS LITERATURE. (3) Fall. Film as a collaborative art form. Elements that combine to make film a unique entity drawing from the worlds of literature, drama, photography and art to define its medium.




391. WRITING NONFICTION. (3) Fall of odd years. Emphasizes the production of nonfiction prose pieces for publication, using a workshop format. Prerequisite: ENG 281 or permission of department chair.




400. RESTORATION AND NEOCLASSIC LITERATURE. (3) Summer of odd years. An in-depth period study with major attention given to Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson.




402. BRITISH ROMANTIC POETRY. (3) Summer of even years. The poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron.




403. STUDY IN LITERATURE OR COMPOSITION. (3) Offered with sufficient demand. Specialized study of the literature of a particular author or field, or advanced study in composition. May be repeated with the consent of the department chair. Prerequisite: Consent of the department chair.




405. VICTORIAN STUDIES. (3) Fall. Offered with sufficient demand. In-depth study of the work of selected major Victorian poets, novelists, and nonfiction writers and how their texts reflect or comment of Victorian art and culture. Content may vary offering to offering.

408. STUDIES IN SHORT FICTION. (3) Spring of even years.  Reading and analysis of short fiction from a variety of cultures in the context of historical developments in the genre. Content varies from year to year and may be repeated with consent of the department chair.




410. STUDIES IN C. S. LEWIS. (3) Fall of odd years. A survey of the major fiction and nonfiction works of the twentieth century’s greatest Christian apologist.

411. AMERICAN NOVEL. (3) Spring of odd years. Development of the American novel from its early instances to the present. Varies from year to year and may be repeated with the consent of the department chair.




415. MYTHOLOGY AND FOLK TALES. (3) Summer with sufficient enrollment. Focuses on major myths and folktales from different cultures and seeks to equip students with critical tools to interpret the products and understand the process of myth making.



418. BRITISH NOVEL. (3) Fall of even years. Development of the British novel from its early instances to the present time. Content varies from year to year and may be repeated with the consent of the department chair.




420. LITERATURE FOR ADOLESCENTS. (3) Fall. Individual titles and characteristics of young adult literature. Includes an overview of the history of young adult literature, a survey of important works, an analysis of individual titles, and methods for developing materials for use in grades 6-12.




422. NATURE AND HISTORY OF LANGUAGE. (3) Spring. Principles of linguistic analysis, history of language study, development of English, functions and varieties of language in society, and establishment of standards.




425. LITERARY THEORY. (3) Fall of even years with sufficient enrollment. Major critics and theory from Plato to post-structuralism, with emphasis on 20th-century developments and beyond.

450. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-3) Offered on demand. A project for senior students majoring in English. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and the department chair.




451. SENIOR PROJECT. (0, 1) Fall, Spring. Oral presentation, in symposium format, of a paper prepared previously or concurrently for an upper-level English course of the student's choice. Must be taken 2 semesters, but credit is earned only in the final semester. Enrolled students will be required to research and present a paper on an approved literature topic.