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Reports

iPads in Education: Latest Craze or Valuable Tool?

by: Nicole Slagter, Harding University Cannon-Clary College of Education

iPad in Education

iPads have permeated recreation, business and even education but is the tablet just the latest tech craze or an actual valuable tool for the classroom? With its lightweight, portable and interactive design and over 20,000 educational apps available, it has potential to be a great tool. There are many obstacles in the way of the iPad becoming mainstream in education however - cost, technological infrastructure required and the ability of teachers to figure out the technology. Today’s students have grown up in a completely digital world so it would be detrimental to ignore the iPad as a legitimate tool. As with any technology however, the iPad needs to be treated as a tool – albeit a very valuable one – to assist the learning process, not some magic pill that will solve all of education’s problems.

To read the paper in its entirety, select the link below:

iPads in Education: Latest Craze or Valuable Tool?

 

White Paper: Tegrity Classroom Lecture Capture System

by: Dr. Connie Elrod, Harding University Center for Learning with Technology

Lecture capture while not a new technology, has only recently become prevalent at institutions of higher education. Classroom lecture capture involves the recording of classroom lectures, which are then made available online for student viewing. As with any university, the desire to provide every resource necessary to assure academic success for all students is paramount at Harding. The lure of lecture capture is the ability for those students in courses with complex material to be able to view the lecture again.

Beginning in Intersession of 2011, the Center for Learning with Technology initiated a pilot program to investigate the merits of Tegrity's lecture capture software system. Three teachers from different departments piloted the system. Both students and teachers were surveyed after their experiences with the classroom lecture capture system. Overwhelmingly, students broadly favored the inclusion of lecture capture in the three classrooms. Many reflected that lecture capture enabled them to review more difficult concepts and to “take notes at their speed rather than trying to keep up in class.” Eighty-one percent responded “strongly agree” or “somewhat agree” that watching recorded lectures helped them get a better grade. For the most part, the instructors’ experience with the classroom lecture system was also positive. To summarize the teachers’ responses: “This technology was a tremendous benefit for my summer class, which is extremely intense. I am not sure how it will be accepted during the regular semester. I am concerned that students will use this as a license to miss class (although they will be warned of the consequences).”

The advantages appear to be numerous, but further study is needed in order to answer remaining questions concerning whether frequent use of lecture capture improves student academic performance, hinders class attendance, and/or improves class interaction.

Currently, we have 100 hours of storage space available for captured lectures. Faculty and student demand will determine whether extra storage space will be purchased. As we move forward, we will continue to examine and evaluate the content management side of the classroom lecture capture system: how we will archive the lectures, whether short-term or long-term storage is best, and what steps will be taken when the demand either increases or decreases.

Technology is changing the way students communicate with one another and inherently impacts the way we teach and the way our students learn. The classroom capture lecture system, while producing many positive results, should not be a substitute for the live classroom experience, but rather, function as an extension and enhancement of it (Ramaswami, 2009).

To read the white paper in it's entirety, select the link below:

Tegrity Whitepaper

Select the Prezi link to view the Tegrity presentation:

 

Harding Center for Learning with Technology
501-279-5201
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