Finance 322 -- Personal Finance

Spring, 2014

View Schedule

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instructor: Dr Steve Williams

Office: Mabee 215

Office Hours:

M-W-F: 8:00 AM to 11:00 AM (less chapel)

T/TH: 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM (less chapel)

Class Hours:

Marketing: M/W/F (11:00-11:50 AM)
Personal Finance: Tue/Thu (10:00 AM & 11:30 AM)

Office Phone: (501) 279-4095

 Send E-mail to Steve Williams

Web Address for Course: http://www.harding.edu/slwilliams/

Classroom: Mabee 101

 

IMPORTANT NOTICE

[There are expanded guideline links throughout this syllabus]

It is each student's responsibility to

READ THIS SYLLABUS CAREFULLY AND THOROUGHLY!

If you have any questions, ask your instructor for clarification.

 

Required Textbooks:

·       Gitman, J.G., Joehnk, M.D. & Billingsley, R.S. (2011); PFIN3 (2013-2014 Ed.); ISBN:  1285082575 (or 978-1285082578); Cengage (South-Western) Publishing.Here is the Amazon.com link for the textbook:  http://www.amazon.com/PFIN3-CourseMate-Printed-Access-Card/dp/1285082575/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1370210402&sr=1-1&keywords=pfin3

·       NOTE:  This book cannot be resold at the end of the semester due to the computer access code. 

 

Finance 322 - Personal Finance (3 Hours)

Prerequisite:  None

Course Description:  Managing personal finances; inflation and recession; tax problems; insurance; annuities; credit; budgeting; financial planning; home ownership; bank accounts; investments; and social insurance programs.

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[More Information About the Course]

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Course Outcomes:

The general objectives of the course are to:

  • Understand the following concepts in general, and some in specific, terms:  Income Tax; Credit; Budget; Financial Statements; Buying a Car; Buying a house; Buying real estate; Insurance (health, life, home, auto, disability, homeowners & renters); Banking; Investing; retirement; and the Time Value of Money.  These  and all concepts in the course will be taught with an emphasis on a Christian World-View as well as an emphasis on the issues surrounding the Biblical concept of stewardship.  Assessment: In-class discussion, the course projects, assignments, and quizzes.
  • Design and understand how to use a personal budget regularly. Assessment: In-class discussion, the course projects, assignments, and quizzes.
  • Through use of examples, the concept of the time-value of money. Assessment: In-class discussion, the course projects, assignments, and quizzes.
  • Recognize and describe different types of long-term and short-term investments. Assessment: In-class discussion, the course projects, assignments, and quizzes.
  • Introduce the student to the basics of financial planning and help them with their personal career strategies.  Assessment: In-class discussion, the course projects, assignments, and quizzes.
  • Familiarize students with various financial planning tools, including the balance sheet, a cash flow statement, and a personal budget..  Assessment: In-class discussion, the course projects, assignments, and quizzes.
  • Emphasize the importance of good decisions when it comes to making financial decisions related to credit and banking.  Assessment: In-class discussion, the course projects, assignments, and quizzes.
  • Promote student interest in keeping themselves financially healthy, to include effective budget management. Assessment: In-class discussion, the course projects, assignments, and quizzes.
  • Improve the student's knowledge of investment strategies, retirement strategies, and credit strategies. Assessment: In-class discussion, the course projects, assignments, and quizzes.

Specific goals include (but are not limited to):

    • Develop a comprehensive financial plan involving asset acquisition, liability and insurance planning, saving and investment programs, tax planning, retirement and estate planning.
    • Use the time value of money to make financial planning decisions.
    • Identify products and services in financial planning.
    • Explain the rewards of sound financial planning.
    • Explain the steps in personal financial planning.
    • Explain the role of financial statements in financial planning.
    • Explain the principal of income taxation.
    • Develop an understanding of the use of tools used in cash management.
    • Analyze the rent-versus-buy decision process.
    • Analyze different types of mortgages.
    • Develop alternatives in borrowing
    • Develop concepts of risks.
    • Understand the different methods of determining life insurance needs.
    • Understand the different types of life insurance products.
    • Be able to analyze the different types of coverage for property.
    • Identify the different investment risks and ways of reducing those risks.
    • Explain terminology unique to stock transactions.
    • Identify different types of mutual funds and appropriate uses of the funds.
    • Estimate retirement needs and develop a plan for achieving the needs.
    • Define the different kinds of trust and where they may be used.
    • Describe a will and the advantages of having one.
    • Recognize and describe different types of long-term and short-term investments.  
    • Implement a tool to track actual spending and compare it to budgeted spending.
    • List and identify different types of insurance and evaluate the appropriateness of the insurance for different situations.
    • Identify the different ways of purchasing insurance.
    • Describe different ways of buying and selling a car.
    • Identify common pitfalls in managing personal credit lines including credit cards.
    • Discuss at least three estate planning options.
    • Learn to plan and budget for a vacation utilizing WWW information.
    • Explain disability income insurance.  

NOTE:  All topics in this course are designed to help the student understand the importance of a good, sound financial management system in life from a Christian perspective. 

 

Information and Participation Sheets:  [MORE] 

 

Teaching Method:  [MORE]

 

Classroom Expectations:  [MORE] 

 

Course Grading Outline

Your final grade will be based upon your performance on the following:

  • Chapter Quizzes – 15 x 25 points each = 375
  • Personal Projects (5 @ 50 Points Each) - 250 points
  • Participation (30 Classes @ 5 Points each) - 150 points
  • Detailed Personal Budget (12 months--this is the Final Examination) - 100 points

·       Total Points Possible = 875

Final grades will be assigned using the following scale:

·       A ... 788 - 875 points (90 - 100%)

  • B ... 700 - 787 points (80 - 89%)
  • C ... 613 - 699 points (70 - 79%)
  • D ... 525 - 612 points (60 - 69%)

POSTING OF GRADES:  Your grades will be accessible from the Internet through Canvas.  You should be able to access the grade for each of the course assignments and examinations as well as your current grade in the course.  It is your responsibility to check your grades to ensure correctness on my part.  If you find an error, bring it to my attention and we will get it fixed (or explain why it cannot be changed).  Remember:  Once the grades have been turned in to the registrar upon completion of the course, it is too late to change the grades.  The final day to make any changes to posted grades is Friday before final exams begin.  I will announce this several weeks in advance to ensure you are reminded of this deadline.  Once we pass this deadline, I will not go back and revisit any grades in any area other than the grade on the final exam.  Final exams not submitted by the beginning of the scheduled final exam session will not be counted in the final grade tally.   It is your responsibility to review your posted grades on Canvas regularly and advise me of any problems noted. 

 

 

 

Details of Grading Requirements

Examination Procedures:

There are no examinations in this course.  Instead, you will take a weekly quiz for each chapter of the textbook on Canvas.  These quizzes will be summed and will take the place of any in-classroom examinations. 

Weekly Quizzes

Quizzes are given over each chapter of the book.  They must be completed by the deadline stated in the schedule for the course, and they must be completed in the time allocated for each quiz.  All quizzes are scheduled on a weekly basis (since we cover one chapter per week), and come at the end of our discussion of that chapter.  We all know how easy it is to let reading assignments build up.  This approach prevents you from having this problem, and totally removes the stress of examinations from the course.    By having quizzes over the chapters on a weekly basis, this helps you to keep up with your readings, makes cramming the day or two before the test unnecessary, and allows you to finish one chapter before moving on to the next.  In addition, you have learned (or will learn in your psychology courses) that learning is facilitated by spaced rather than massed practice. 

My job, as your instructor is to help you learn this material, so helping you space out your studying over the course of the semester will help us accomplish this goal.  Incidentally, you still need to read the chapters before we begin our week of discussion on any chapter.  Although the lectures will sometimes review material from the text, often lectures and class presentations will supplement the readings.  Since these lectures and class activities will assume you have some familiarity with the concepts in the textbook, you will find that you get more out of them if you have read the chapter.

Policies for quizzes:  There are a few important procedural matters regarding the quizzes.  One is that, since the quizzes are given at the end of each week, you will need to space your schedule to make sure you do not miss taking one.  Quizzes must be taken before Sunday night after the week of discussion.  The quizzes are timed to shut down at midnight on Sunday night.  If you do not make the schedule, by even a few seconds, you will not be able to take the quiz. No exceptions to this policy.  Since you have access to the quiz for 8 days, there is no reason to ever miss a quiz.  IMPORTANT: THERE ARE NO OPPORTUNITIES TO MAKE UP ANY MISSED QUIZZES. 

Further, students like to have the answers to the quizzes provided after completing them.  After you complete the quiz, your score will be tallied, and you will be informed of how you did by the software. 

Violation of Academic Integrity:  It shall be considered a violation of Harding’s Academic Integrity policy if a student copies any personal quiz in Canvas, for any purpose.  Quizzes are not to be copied or distributed, either to other members of the course, or for other purposes (such as study for the exams).  For grading purposes, a first violation of this policy will be grounds to award a failing grade for the quiz.  A second violation will be forwarded to the Dean of the college. 

Once you have started taking a quiz, you are considered to have taken it.  You cannot return at a later time and re-take it. 

Remember:  All quizzes should be completed "on your own"--without the aid of friends, classmates, or anyone else--unless instructed otherwise.  You're on your honor here.  NOTE:  You may use your textbook if you desire, but you are strictly timed and you cannot look up the answers to all the questions and complete it on time, so be careful. 

Personal Projects

There are five personal projects due over the course of the semester (on average, about one every other week).  These assignments are due on the date indicated on the course schedule (a part of the syllabus).  These projects have been selected and designed to help you develop and improve your knowledge of various personal financial decisions you will make in your life.   They require an in-depth look (analysis), not just a cursory glance at the topic.  Items submitted will be graded based on depth, critical thought evidenced in the written submission, and the value of the project to an outsider who may be reading it for the first time.  All projects are individual projects and should be typed, be in the writer's own words (if you wish to include something from the internet, it should be attached, not comprise the bulk of the project) and be well presented.  All projects must have a cover page with your name, class, and date.  No project can be submitted except in class.  I do not accept email submissions of any assignment.

NoticeThere are NO opportunities for make-up of projects.  If you miss class when an assignment is due, you will not be able to submit it.  Have a classmate submit it for you.  Projects cannot be submitted either early or late (unless you are traveling for the University, with university approval, and upon prior arrangement with the instructor).  Here are your project assignments:

 

Project 1:  An Imagined Life: Understanding Net Worth & Money Management

Living in the real world costs money, and the first stage of financial security is understanding where you are spending your money and what you are worth.  That means you must carefully evaluate your monthly expenditures, list and value all your possessions, account for all your money, and evaluate your income compared to expenditures.  A side benefit to this project is that it will also help you to see how much money you are actually spending.  It may surprise you.  A Microsoft Word template for a monthly budget and a statement of net worth can be found in the classroom on Canvas.  (Value of Project = 50 Points).  Length expectation:  Use the template provided.

 

Project 2:  An Imagined Life:  The Choice of a Lifetime

Imagine that you have 3 separate lifetimes to live - what would you do with your time? Write about your vision in each lifeline.   Don’t limit yourself to occupational titles or career fields; instead, provide detailed descriptions of what you’d like to be doing, where you would like to live, who you would like to spend time with, and what special skills, training or interests you would hope to explore and develop.  This would include an examination of where you want to go and how you intend to get there.  End your discussion by choosing your most desired life-path and ultimate goal in that life-path.  Prejects 3 & 4 will be based on this final choice.  (Value of Project = 50 Points).  (Length expectation:  3-5 typed pages and a cover page). 

 

Project 3:  An Imagined Life:  Living In The Real World

In project three, your task is to choose where you wish to live, then examine the various factors associated with (a) moving to your new location; (b) an examination of the costs of setting up your living and accommodations; (c) an examination of your expected salary and reasonable start-up and continuing expenses for employment; (d) an examination of weekly, semi-monthly, or monthly expenses (depending on how you are paid by your employer); and (e) a real-world estimation of your ability (given these other factors) to live in a style acceptable to you.  This project should demonstrate a clear knowledge (based on your chosen local labor market examination) of the financial aspects of your first job, from travel to family expenses.  You may find this web page helpful in completing Project 3 (http://www.onetonline.org/).  (Value of Project = 50 Points).  (Length expectation:  3-5 typed pages and a cover page). 

 

Project 4:  An Imagined Life: Learning How to Network (and Doing It)

In project four, your task is simple.  You are to join LINKEDIN and one additional business or career-oriented social network and interact with a minimum of ten (10) members of the chosen networks.  You are not expected to spend any money in this process, so choose networks that will be useful to you that are free.  Find your networks through a google search (NOTE:  If you are not a business student, you may search out a career-oriented social media site related to your chosen career.  However, LINKEDIN has many different interests and careers, so everyone must join LINKEDIN as one of their two sites).  Document a minimum of ten individuals on each site with which you interacted, stating where they are and what you talked about.  The paper need not be more than a list with an explanation of your interactions.  That will give you a list of 20 people in total, followed by a description of your interaction with them.  (Value of Project = 50 Points).  (Length expectation:  3-5 typed pages and a cover page). 

 

Project 5:  An Imagined Life: Preparing for the Last Days

In project five, you will be expected to prepare a living will…a document which can be used for publishing your end-of-life choices to your loved ones and friends.  Everyone needs such a document, but less than 1% of all Americans have executed a living will (as of December 2012, according to Money Magazine).   You will find this web page helpful in this process, and we will review the elements of a Living Will and a Last Will & Testament in classroom discussions.  (Value of Project = 50 Points).  (Length expectation:  The length of your Living Will is prescribed by the legal form for such a document in your state of domicile.  Use the template for your Living Will which you will find at:  http://www.doyourownwill.com/free-living-wills.html .

 

 

Personal Budget Project (Your Final Examination)

Analyze your personal income and expenses (your last complete year).  Draw up a comprehensive budget for your next twelve months (July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015).  You will be provided with appropriate guidelines for preparing this budget during class.  Your final examination will take place during final exam week (see your course schedule for the time of the examination) and you will be asked to write a two-page essay on the implications of your coming budget.  This analysis should include a discussion about your perceived weaknesses, strengths, opportunities, and threats in the forthcoming year--and should also include a discussion about how you plan to deal with emergencies, unexpected costs, etc. (The analysis will be completed during the final examination period and will count for 25% of your final examination grade).  As a reminder, the final budget must include (a) a month-by-month breakdown of anticipated expenses [they cannot be the same for every month]; (b) a statement of net worth for the start of the budget year, and a second one for the end of the budget year; and (c) must be future-oriented [meaning you cannot budget for past months].   The 12-month budget will be submitted at your final examination periodPlease note:  Submission of this final project is mandatory, and is required to pass the course.  If you elect to not submit this final examination, your grade will be recorded as FAIL for the course, notwithstanding any grade you may have elsewhere.  In other words, the final project is a life-preparing event and is not optional. 

(Repeated in the Professionalism Area (next paragraph):  Basic Requirements and assessment points for the two Budget Submissions:  (a) Components of and Spendable Income missing = minus 10 points; (b) Total Expenses or  Surplus/Shortage missing = minus 10 points (each); (c) Absence of Balance Sheet and or Statement of Net Worth = minus 25 points; (d) Balance Sheet not dated = minus 5 points; (e) Total Assets missing = minus 10 points; (f) Total Liabilities missing = minus 10 points; (g) Net Worth missing = minus 10 points; and (h) Monthly Actual and/or Difference columns completed on project 1 – minus 10 points.  There is a general expectation that all assignments will be typed.  If not = minus 10 points…and (i) No cover page = minus 10 points.  Note:  No budget is ever perfect.  You cannot plan your budget around spendable income…thus surplus/shortage will never be a zero. 

ProfessionalismAll work submitted for a grade in this course must be typed, error free, neatly produced and presented, have a cover page and be professional in appearance.  I will reduce any written assignment by 25% if it does not meet these standards.  Consider anything you submit to the instructor to be of the same caliber of work you would submit to your employer.  Here are some additional items you should consider here.   [MORE]

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Participation (not Attendance) Policy

Attendance will be taken at most class sessions, but attendance is not what you are graded on.  You are graded on participation—were you available to participate in active discussion (or able to submit an acceptable substitute listed in this paragraph).  You will lose 5 points for each class in which you do not participate -- thus you begin with a total count of 200 points for participation, and we subtract 5 points if you miss.  You are the ONLY person who may excuse yourself from any missed class.  This can be done in one of two ways:  (1) by submitting an outline of the chapter discussed in the lecture for the class missed on the first day you return after the missed class; or (2) by submitting a skip card (these were provided for your use at the beginning of the course).  This applies to all class misses, excused or not.  AN EXCUSED ABSENCE (say from the nurse or the provost) excuses your absence (Attendance--which is not graded in this course)—but not your participation.  Put another way—nobody can excuse you from any class participation credit except yourself.  Since our primary reason for being here is to learn about marketing concepts, you need to be exposed to all the materials covered by lecture.  You are responsible for making up what you miss when you miss a lecture class period.  Note that participation credit (not ATTENDANCE) is determined by your initials on the sign-in sheet on the day of class.  That means you were there and able to participate if called upon to do so.  NOTE:  Not all classes will be checked—so if you miss a day in which participation initials were not taken—then you will receive credit for participation on that day.  In addition, early in the course, I will give you three skip cards—you may use those as you wish at any time you wish.  Please be aware that if you’re planning activities that will take you away from the classroom—things such as field trips for other classes, mission trips, etc., those four skips are what you should use to get your credit back (if you chose to NOT submit a chapter outline).  NOTE:  After you have three or more classroom absences without a chapter outline excuse or skip cards, you will be warned of your pending removal with a WF grade from the classroom via your registered Harding email address.  After the warning, any additional unexcused absence will result in your removal with a WF grade without any additional contact.  This is important because if you receive such a warning, it is critical that you immediately submit any skip cards or chapter outlines to move you away from that drop zone.    IMPORTANT:  If you have free skip cards remaining at the end of the semester, you may turn each one in for 5 bonus points each.

Bonus Point Opportunity:  Students may obtain bonus points by attending ASI speaker presentations, by getting involved in community service (see the [MORE] tab which follows this paragraph, and through any number of other opportunities.  Discuss any planned community service with me for guidance and get involved as much as you can.  Click on this tab to find more information on extra/bonus point credit in this course:    [MORE]

 

 

Miscellaneous Stuff

University and COBA Assessment:  Harding University, since its charter in 1924, has been strongly committed to providing the best resources and environment for the teaching-learning process. The board, administration, faculty, and staff are wholeheartedly committed to full compliance with all criteria of the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The university values continuous, rigorous assessment at every level for its potential to improve student learning and achievement and for its centrality in fulfilling the stated mission of Harding. Thus, a comprehensive assessment program has been developed that includes both the Academic units and the Administrative and Educational Support (AES) units. Specifically, all academic units will be assessed in reference to the following Expanded Statement of Institutional Purpose: The University provides programs that enable students to acquire essential knowledge, skills, and dispositions in their academic disciplines for successful careers, advanced studies, and servant leadership.

Students with Disabilities: It is the policy for Harding University to accommodate students with disabilities, pursuant to federal and state law. Therefore, any student with a documented disability condition (e.g. physical, learning, or psychological) who needs to arrange reasonable accommodations must contact the Disabilities Office at the beginning of each semester. (If the diagnosis of the disability occurs during the academic year, the student must self--identify with the Disabilities Office as soon as possible in order to get academic accommodations in place for the remainder of the semester.) The Disabilities Office is located in Room 205 in the Student Center, telephone, (501) 279-4019.


Academic Dishonesty
Honesty and integrity are characteristics that should describe each one of us as servants of Jesus Christ.  As your instructor, I pledge that I will strive for honesty and integrity in how I handle the content of this course and in how I interact with each of you.  I ask that you join me in pledging to do the same.  Academic dishonesty will result in penalties up to and including dismissal from the class with a failing grade and will be reported to the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs. All instances of dishonesty will be handled according to the procedures delineated in the Harding University catalog.

Laptop Computers and Cell Phones are ProhibitedBecause they are seriously distracting to the group (and to me), I do not allow the use of laptop computers or operational cell phones in the classroom.  This would include any kind of text messaging device and any kind of audio player (IPOD, etc).  Persons with a bonafide reason for using a laptop (with approval of the University) will be asked to sit on the front row of the classroom so that they will be less distracting for everyone else in the room.

AssessmentHarding University, since its charter in 1924, has been strongly committed to providing the best resources and environment for the teaching--learning process. The board, administration, faculty, and staff are wholeheartedly committed to full compliance with all criteria of the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The university values continuous, rigorous assessment at every level for its potential to improve student learning and achievement and for its centrality in fulfilling the stated mission of Harding. Thus, a comprehensive assessment program has been developed that includes both the Academic units and the Administrative and Educational Support (AES) units. Specifically, all academic units will be assessed in reference to the following Expanded Statement of Institutional Purpose: The University provides programs that enable students to acquire essential knowledge, skills, and dispositions in their academic disciplines for successful careers, advanced studies, and servant leadership.

Honor CodeMy personal honor code is "I will not lie, cheat, or steal--nor tolerate those among us who do such things."  Copying the work of another student is cheating and will result in your dismissal from the course with a failing grade.  Additionally, knowingly permitting your work to be copied may also result in your dismissal from the course.  The online quizzes are your primary test mechanism in this course.  I expect them to be your own personal work, without consultation with--or help from--any other student.  Persons submitting a "get out of jail free" card at the end of the semester will be asked if they have lived up to this code during the semester as a condition for receiving these bonus points.

Academic Grievance ProceduresAs with any job you will take in the future, they will probably have procedures for you to follow if you feel you have been overlooked, mistreated, or given an unfair evaluation.  Any company with several employees should have an employee handbook stating how to handle these situations.  Going straight to the corporate president or venting your case before the fellow employees resulting in division between employees and administration are quick methods of losing your job whether you were right or not.  This is an important lesson to learn before you join the full-time work force.  Harding University also has academic grievance procedures if you feel you have been overlooked, mistreated, or given an unfair evaluation.  This process begins with talking to your professor first about the issue at hand and providing a written complaint within 7 days of the alleged incident.  Please refer to page 33 of the current HU catalog for further steps regarding this grievance policy.  We are committed to fairness in regards to our students.  We hope you will never need these procedures, but they are available at your initiation and discretion.

Academic IntegrityHonesty and integrity are characteristics that should describe each one of us as servants of Jesus Christ. As your instructor, I pledge that I will strive for honesty and integrity in how I handle the content of this course and in how I interact with each of you. I ask that you join me in pledging to do the same.  Academic dishonesty will result in penalties up to and including dismissal from the class with a failing grade and will be reported to the Associate Provost. All instances of dishonesty will be handled according to the procedures delineated in the Harding University catalog.

Time Management ExpectationsFor every class hour, the typical student should expect to spend at least two clock hours a week of problem solving, reading, reviewing, organizing notes, preparing for coming exams/quizzes and other activities that enhance learning.

 

[Additional Miscellaneous Stuff]

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View Schedule for Course

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Canvas Information:  Canvas Is an internet based program we will be using in this course to:

·       Participation in any discussions using the Canvas Discussion Board is not required for this course.
 

·       Take online chapter quizzes.   All quizzes (weekly homework assignments) for this course are given online through Canvas.  There is a 30-minute time limit for each quiz.  Sharing of quiz questions or consulting any fellow student or teacher will be considered cheating.  You may use your book and notes during the quiz.
 

·       Check your Point totals in this course using Canvas Grade Book.  Once your assignments have been graded by the instructor, your point totals will be posted in this area.


Remember:  All Assignments and due dates for the entire semester can be found on the course homepage schedule (just click on Class Schedule above or below).  Follow the appropriate link to find out what each assignment consists of and when it is due.  Assignments will not be accepted late, so make sure you are aware of each assignment and when it is due.

If you have any questions or concerns please contact me. I will be available beginning the first official day of classes. My office phone number is 279-4095 and my E-mail address is: slwilliams@harding.edu.  (NOTE:  If you send me an email, please remember I have over 300 students and multiple classes.  Tell me the class you're in so I can find your records more quickly). 

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Summary of Common Professional Component Topics Covered in this Course

[This course covers the following business topics in these estimated amounts]

    • Production or Operations Management (0 hours)
    • Marketing (5 hours)
    • Business Finance (10 hours)
    • Legal Environment of Business (5 hour)
    • Economics (10 hour)
    • Business Ethics (3 hours)
    • Accounting (3 hours)
    • Management Information Systems (2 hours)
    • Quantitative Techniques & Statistics (5 hours)
    • Management (3 hours)
    • Organization Behavior (1 hours)
    • Human Resource Management (1 hours)
    • Policy or Strategy (0 hours)
    • Comprehensive or Integrating Experience (0 hours)
    • Global Dimension of Business (2 hours)

NOTE:  CPC topics taught in courses are not mutually exclusive.  The hours shown in this summary may add to more than 45 contact hours because certain topics may include more than one CPC.  For example, a lecture on international marketing would include both "marketing" and "global dimension of business."  Thanks to Dr Daniel Graybill for the "get out of jail free" idea.  :-)

 

 

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This page last updated December 23, 2013
URL: http://www.harding.edu/slwilliams/sylfin322-1a.htm