Harding Magazine Fall 2010

Around Campus

Business honors Carter, expands facilities
Academic growth prompts administrative shuffle
New board member’s roots grow deep
Longtime Bible dean, wife recognized
Name changes commemorate mentors
Moving higher in the rankings
Remembering 9/11
The president’s right hand
National rankings recognize service learning
Physical therapy slated for fall 2011
A taste of Tuscany in Searcy
University national recycling competitor
Service tradition continues
Professional center begins on Memphis campus

Business honors Carter, expands facilities

Architectural rendering of the Mabee Building's new look

The College of Business Administration has been named the Paul R. Carter College of Business Administration by the board of trustees in honor of Carter’s iconic leadership in Arkansas business. The decision, made at the board’s spring meeting, was effective immediately.

Carter was selected a member of the board in 1985. He served as chairman for four years and also filled roles as treasurer and on the executive committee. He continued on the board until his death in October 2009 following a long battle with cancer.

In addition to wearing a new name, the Mabee Building, which has housed business programs since 1982, began a major facilities upgrade in July. Renovations include new classrooms, a finance trading lab, expanded student common areas, break-out rooms for group projects, faculty offices, and a center for alumni networking.

Construction is being carried out in two phases with the first and largest phase scheduled for completion in May 2011. The second phase will begin that same month and conclude in August 2011.

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Academic growth prompts administrative shuffle

Dr. Rebecca O. Weaver

End of semester changes prompted several administration modifications across campus. The College of Communication named a dean, and a department split yielded two chairs in the College of Sciences.

Dr. Rebecca O. Weaver took on the role of dean for the College of Communication July 1, making her the University’s third-ever female dean. Weaver was a key player during the development of the speech-language pathology graduate program as well as the SLP program at the University’s international campus in Zambia, Africa. Before being named dean — a position vacated by Dr. Mike James — she served as professor and chair of the communication sciences and disorders department housed within the college.

Along with a new dean, the college now houses three additional departments and one division. The newly formed department of theatre is chaired by Robin Miller, and Dr. Jack Shock chairs the newly formed department of mass communication. Dr. Dan Tullos serves as chair of the department of communication sciences and disorders, which was formed in conjunction with the development of the master’s program. The oral communication division is directed by Dr. Pat Garner.

Across campus, the College of Sciences played its own version of musical chairs. Upon the retirement of department of kinesiology Chairman Wilt Martin, the department was divided into separate departments — kinesiology and exercise and sports sciences.

Dr. Stephen Burks assumed leadership over the kinesiology department, having filled the role of assistant professor and wellness program coordinator. Dr. Ken Turley, an associate professor, is positioned as head of the exercise and sports sciences department. 

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New board member’s roots grow deep

Charles Ganus

Searcy native Charles Ganus (’76) has been named to the board of trustees. The decision was made prior to the semi–annual board meeting in May, which Ganus attended.

Ganus is vice president of International Downstream for Murphy Oil Corp. and managing director of Murco Petroleum Ltd. He is the son of Chancellor Clifton L. Ganus Jr. and grandson of 1940-54 board Chairman Clifton L. Ganus Sr.

After graduating from the University, he earned an M.B.A. and Juris Doctorate degree from University of Alabama and is a graduate of Harvard Business School’s Advanced Management Program. He has served as chairman of the President’s Development Council and is a member of the University Builder’s Circle. Ganus and his wife, Patty Sapio (’79), have two children — Ashley (’07) and Kevin, a junior at the University.

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Longtime Bible dean, wife recognized

In August, President David B. Burks announced that the Institute for Church and Family had been renamed the Carl and Frankie Mitchell Center for Leadership and Ministry.

The Mitchells were longtime missionaries in Italy before joining the University. Carl served as dean of the College of Bible and Religion and now holds the position of scholar in residence, while Frankie formerly served as director of human resources.

“The Mitchells are truly Harding treasures,” said Burks. “Their strong commitment to world missions and their joyous optimism have made them highly influential advocates of many good causes. Chief among these has been Carl’s dedicated promotion of the ‘priesthood of all believers,’ which led him to craft and promote the vocational ministry major in the College of Bible and Religion. Consequently, it is most appropriate that the office which has the primary responsibility for housing this major should now be called the Carl and Frankie Mitchell Center for Leadership and Ministry.”

Andrew Baker continues as director of the center, which is housed under the Office of Church Relations led by Dr. Bruce McLarty, vice president for spiritual life. The Mitchell Center works with Uplift, TC Magazine, the Encouragement Foundation, and the leadership and ministry second major (formerly the vocational ministry second major).

The new Center for Spiritual Leadership, directed by Dr. Randy Willingham, will provide assistance to churches transitioning to new ministers or elders, church consultation services, and other services as needed.

Abundant Living, directed by Kay Gowen, will continue to serve Christian senior adults.

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Name changes commemorate mentors

The board of trustees voted to honor two icons of leadership during its semiannual meeting in May.

Nursing students are now studying under the Carr College of Nursing, named in honor of Dr. James F. (Jimmy) Carr Jr., who served as assistant to the president for nearly 25 years. Carr, who remained active on campus even after his retirement in 1997, died at 95 in April 2009 after spending more than 50 years in higher education in Florida and Arkansas.

As president, Dr. Clifton L. Ganus Jr. gave Carr the task of spearheading the creation of the University’s nursing program, which opened its doors in 1975.

The name change was effective immediately and pays homage to Carr for his years of service and dedication to the University.

The board also approved the renaming of the Center for Health Sciences after Dr. Henry (’48) and Grace Farrar (’48) for their pioneering work in health missions. The Farrars moved to Nigeria, West Africa, to begin Nigerian Christian Hospital and an outpatient clinic in 1964. Today the facility continues their work, serving 30,000 patients each year. 

The Farrars also worked in medical missions in other parts of Africa and lived for a year in Shenyang, China, where Henry was visiting professor of surgery at China Medical University and Grace, a nurse, taught medical students preparing for graduate work in the U.S. Henry died in February after suffering a fall while working at Carthage (Tenn.) General Hospital.

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Moving higher in the rankings

Harding was again ranked one of the best universities in the South in U.S. News & World Report’s annual America’s Best Colleges issue.
• 20th this year, up six spots from last year
• The only Arkansas institution included among the top 40 regional universities in the South
• No. 5 — up from No. 9 last year — on its “Great Schools, Great Prices” list
• Included in America’s Best Colleges issue for 17 consecutive years

[6,810]
fall 2010 enrollment 
up 3 percent from fall 2009’s 6,613 
4,201, undergraduate enrollment 
2,609, graduate enrollment

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Remembering 9/11

John Myers and daughters Lucy and Josey place flags on the front lawn

Joey Myers (’01), husband of Armstrong Residence Life Coordinator Emily Myers (’01), and daughters Lucy and Josey help American Studies students place 2,977 flags outlining the perimeter of the front lawn in remembrance of those who died Sept. 11, 2001.

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The president’s right hand

Claudette Bratcher

When Claudette Bratcher arrived on campus 23 years ago, she had no idea she would one day become secretary to the University’s fourth president.

She had been working in former Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Neale Pryor’s office for only a semester when College of Business Administration Dean Dr. David Burks approached her with a very special request — he wanted her to be his secretary when he stepped into the president’s office later that year. Bratcher was excited but a little hesitant at first.

“I was thrilled … I couldn’t believe it. I never thought that would happen,” says Bratcher. “Dr. Burks called me over and asked me to work for him. I told him I couldn’t because it wouldn’t be fair to Dr. Pryor since I had only worked for him one semester. But he said it was OK and that he had already asked Dr. Pryor.” 

Bratcher, who has been working since she was 15, always wanted to work in a Christian environment and says she loves the atmosphere on campus. She spends her days right outside the president’s office, tracking his schedule, arranging meetings, typing correspondence, and many other duties too numerous to name. 

Through the years there have been many changes, including a total renovation of the American Heritage Center, which houses the president’s office, and the launch of a new tool that has forever changed the way we communicate — e-mail. Gone are the days of carbon copies, typewriters and correction fluid. Bratcher says the ease of e-mail has been a fantastic addition to the everyday flow of work and saves lots of time and energy.

“In the beginning, we sent every letter on letterhead. Now, most correspondence is done by e-mail. It makes it a lot easier. Any time you write the board, that’s 25 to 30 letters, and [Burks] writes the board about once a month. You save paper, and it’s a very good thing to do because you’re not spending as much money on office supplies.”

Bratcher also schedules weddings in Cone Chapel and says she loves meeting happy brides- and grooms-to-be. She recounts her most memorable introductions, however, to be when she met President George W. Bush and former United Kingdom Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who have both been speakers in the American Studies Institute Distinguished Lecture Series.

“They were both very down-to-earth, kind, genuine people. You don’t think about their being normal people, but they really are.”

Bratcher and her husband, Stan, have been married 51 years. Retired after 42 years of preaching, he drops her off at work every morning and picks her up in the evening. They have three children and nine grandchildren, two of whom are students at the University.

Bratcher plans to retire with Burks, but she’ll still have plenty to keep herself busy when that day comes. With her children and grandchildren spread out over two other states and one foreign country, she’ll have an abundance of ball games and world travels to fill up her daybook. — Heather Williams

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National rankings recognize service learning

Washington Monthly 2010 cover

Harding has been classified as one of the best master’s universities in the nation in Washington Monthly magazine’s 2010 college guide.

Schools are rated based on their contribution to the public good in three broad categories including social mobility (recruiting and graduating low-income students), research (producing cutting-edge scholarship and doctorates) and service (encouraging students to give something back to their country).

Harding was ranked 39th in the nation and was the only Arkansas university included in the top 50.

“Harding University is annually recognized by organizations such as U.S. News & World Report and Princeton Review as one of the best colleges in the South,” said Dr. Jim Carr, Harding executive vice president. “To be recognized by Washington Monthly as one of the best in the entire nation based on factors such as our commitment to service learning is truly an honor.”

The magazine ranked master’s and baccalaureate institutions for the first time this year, avoiding regional categories in order to give readers a true comparison of colleges nationwide. All three main categories — social mobility, research and service — were weighed equally in measuring each school.

The number of students participating in community service and institutional support for community service were two new criteria introduced to this year’s rankings. The information used was based on data reported to the Corporation for National and Community Service by colleges and universities in their applications for the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll, which has recognized the University the past four years.

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Physical therapy slated for fall 2011

A new doctoral program will begin on campus next fall, generating an opportunity for students to pursue a career field that is expected to grow by 30 percent between 2008 and 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The three-year physical therapy program will offer a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree, and its inaugural class will include 30 students. The same number of students will be added each year, making the program fully staffed and fully functional with a total of 90 students in 2013.

“The physical therapy program will join our other fields of study in health sciences,” said President David B. Burks. “With the physician assistant and pharmacy programs already firmly in place, physical therapy is the perfect next step.”

Dr. Mike McGalliard began his tenure as program director in August. He is a licensed physical therapist and former faculty member in the School of Allied Health Sciences at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Amarillo, Texas.

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A taste of Tuscany in Searcy

Harding University's villa in Florence, Italy

The University’s international programs are celebrating a major milestone this fall, marking 30 years since the first study abroad program began in Florence, Italy, in 1980. To commemorate the occasion, the campus community will come together to raise money and celebrate all of the international campuses, with HUF as the flagship program.

The weekend celebration has been dubbed “Harding University brings Tuscany to Searcy” and will kick off Dec. 3 with a HUF-themed chapel featuring special guest Simone Gheri, mayor of Scandicci. HUF Director Robbie Shackelford will showcase artwork at a special show Dec. 4 to raise money for the Havens at Namwianga, Zambia.

The festivities will culminate with a 30th anniversary banquet in Cone Chapel Dec. 4 at 7 p.m. Tickets for the banquet are $50 per person, and guests will enjoy an Italian buffet, silent auction, and special Florentine entertainment by opera singer Letizia Dei and harpist Andrea Piazza. All proceeds will go toward the University’s international programs.

Chancellor Clifton L. Ganus and Dr. Don Shackelford, who were instrumental in the start of international programs at the University, will be recognized for their vision and dedication. Robbie Shackelford and his wife, Mona, an instructor and personnel supervisor at HUF, have worked for the program since 1990 and will be recognized for their service at the banquet as well.

To purchase tickets and for donation information, contact the Office of Alumni Relations at 1-800-477-4312, ext. 1.

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University national recycling competitor

The University was one of slightly more than 600 colleges nationwide to participate in Recyclemania, a 10-week competition designed to increase campus recycling. The University implemented a campus-wide program in 2008, collecting 154,000 pounds of material in its first year, and decided to join in Recyclemania for the 2009-10 year. The competition weighed all recycled material collected by the University and compared it to the amount of trash produced by the school.

Total pounds collected • 58,940
Cumulative pounds of recycled material per person • 9.89 lbs.
Overall cumulative recycling rate of participation • 25.19%
Bins on campus• 909

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Service tradition continues

During the 2008-09 academic year, nearly 6,500 students, faculty and staff contributed more than 89,000 hours of service to numerous projects. Such efforts caught the attention of the Corporation for National and Community Service, which, in April, named the University to the 2009 President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for the fourth consecutive year. 

“Our mission at Harding includes the integration of faith, learning and living. From that mission stems the commitment to teach students the value and impact of servant leadership, laying the foundation for a lifetime of service,” said President David B. Burks.

The prestigious honor was bestowed upon slightly more than 700 colleges and universities nationwide this year and recognizes the exemplary contributions of students, faculty and staff in meeting critical community and national needs. The University was one of only five schools honored in Arkansas.

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Professional center begins on Memphis campus

The Mid-South Professional Center opened its doors in August, providing another avenue for professionals and students in the education sector to pursue graduate study. 

Students can choose from programs leading to master’s degrees in reading or advanced teaching and learning as well as a Master of Arts in Teaching degree. The advanced teaching and learning subject area contains coursework leading to national board certification.

Dr. Ileene Huffard is director of the center, located on the Harding University Graduate School of Religion campus in Memphis, Tenn. For more information, call 901-432-7726 or e-mail ihuffard@harding.edu.

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