• This is a photo from National Leadership Forum.

    Hands-on leadership training

    Student leaders in grades 9-12 will gain invaluable training to become leaders in their schools.

  • This is a photo from National Leadership Forum.

    Explore economic and cultural principles

    Students will become more equipped to preserve the ideas upon which America was founded.

  • This is a photo from National Leadership Forum.

    A line up of dynamic speakers

    Students will experience media, discussions and labs that emphasize strong leadership and excellent character.

National Leadership Forum

June 3-8, 2018 at Harding University

The American Studies Institute is proudly preparing for the Harding University’s 62nd Annual of the National Leadership Forum in Searcy, Arkansas, June 3-8, 2018.  The theme for 2018 is Real Heroes.

The cost is $145 for the week. This is an outstanding value. During this program, student leaders in grades 9-12 will explore the economic and cultural principles that were the foundation of civilization in the Western Hemisphere. Through labs, lectures, and open discussion sessions, they will become more equipped to preserve the ideas upon which America was founded, including personal freedom, strong leadership and excellent character. As Lawrence W. Reed has said, “If you want to live in a free society, you must assign top priority to raising the caliber of your character.”

Open to student leaders in grades 9, 10, 11 and 12
Students should be rising 9th, 10th, 11th, or 12th graders. They must have excellent character and demonstrate leadership ability. A reference form is required for each student that wishes to attend to attest to leadership and character.

Supervised university dorm life

College aged counselors will provide supervision for men's and women's residence halls at all times. Students will be housed in traditional dorm rooms with a roommate of the same gender and share a bathroom with two other same gender students. Linens are not provided, so students will need to bring bedding (twin sized bedding or sleeping bag), a pillow, and a towel. Bring all toiletries, as well.

Students should plan to arrive Sunday afternoon from 2-4 P.M. Dinner will be at 5 P.M. that evening.  All activities will begin at 7 P.M. Transportation and associated costs are to be arranged by each applicant and/or his sponsor.

Register

Please fill out the online registration form below.

Register

Deadline for registration and payment: MAY 1, 2018

If you need to contact us with questions:

Harding University
ASI/National Leadership Forum
Box 10762
Searcy, AR 72149-5615
501-279-4497

Schedule

Sunday, June 3
1:45 p.m. — Registration in the Heritage Lobby; move into dorms
5 p.m. — Dinner in Heritage Cafeteria
7 p.m. — Opening Program/orientation
10 p.m. — Room check
11:30 p.m. — Lights out
Monday, June 4
7:30 a.m. — Breakfast in Heritage Cafeteria
8:30 a.m. — Campus orientation tour/welcome
9:30 a.m. — Speaker:
10:15 a.m. — Break
10:30 a.m. — Speaker: 
11:30 a.m. — Lunch in Heritage Cafeteria
1 p.m. — Speaker:
1:45 p.m. — Break
2 p.m. — Speaker: 
3 p.m. — Afternoon activity
5 p.m. — Dinner in Heritage Cafeteria
7 p.m. — Evening activity
10 p.m. — Room check
11:30 p.m. — Lights out
Tuesday, June 5
7:30 a.m. — Breakfast in Heritage Cafeteria
8:30 a.m. — Group photo on Benson Auditorium Steps
9:30 a.m. — Speaker: 
10:15 a.m. — Break
10:30 a.m. — Speaker: 
11:30 a.m. — Lunch in Heritage Cafeteria
1 p.m. — Speaker: 
1:45 p.m. — Break
2 p.m. — Speaker: 
3 p.m. — Afternoon activity
5 p.m. — Dinner in Heritage Cafeteria
7 p.m. — Evening activity
10 p.m. — Room check
11:30 p.m. — Lights out
Wednesday, June 6
7:30 a.m. — Breakfast in Heritage Cafeteria
8:30 a.m. — Morning activity
9:30 a.m. —  Speaker: 
10:15 a.m. — Break
10:30 a.m. — Speaker:
11:30 a.m. — Lunch in Heritage Cafeteria
1 p.m. —  Special presentation
1:45 p.m. — Break
2 p.m. —  Speaker: 
3 p.m. — Afternoon activity
5 p.m. — Dinner in Heritage Cafeteria
7 p.m. — Evening activity
10 p.m. — Room check
11:30 p.m. — Lights out
Thursday, June 7
7:30 a.m. — Breakfast in Heritage Cafeteria
8:30 a.m. — Feedback
9:30 a.m. — Speaker: 
10:15 a.m. — Break
10:30 a.m. — Speaker:
11:30 a.m. — Lunch in Heritage Cafeteria
1 p.m. —  Speaker:
2 p.m. — Speaker: 
3 p.m. — Afternoon activity
6 p.m. — Dinner: Banquet/team competition
10 p.m. — Room check
11:30 p.m. — Lights out
Friday, June 8
7:30 a.m. — Breakfast in Heritage Cafeteria
8:30 a.m. — Check out of dorms

Speakers - 2017

Dr. Andrew Baker
A photo of Andrew Baker
Dr. Andrew Baker serves as Executive Director of both The Encouragement Foundation and The Mitchell Center for Leadership and Ministry. He also serves as Associate Professor in the College of Bible and Religion at Harding. In his positions, Andrew works to foster individual growth and encourage service in individuals around the world.
B. Chris Simpson
This is a photo of B. Chris Simpson.
B. Chris Simpson has served as minister at Holmes Road Church of Christ since 2012. He graduated from Harding where he met and married his best friend, Hailey. They have two small children, Elle and Grey. B. Chris loves to sing, cook and dance – preferably all at once.
Melissa Bratton
This is a photo of Melissa Bratton.

Melissa Bratton began her career with the Tennessee Farm Bureau in May of 2006 as the Assistant Director of Communications, after graduating from Tennessee Tech University with a degree in Agriculture Science.  Melissa helps produce a number of specialty videos for Farm Bureau and other ag organizations and works to help local and national media outlets on behalf of Tennessee farmers. Melissa also writes for the TN Farm Bureau News and is responsible for the content and maintenance of the TN Farm Bureau website.
Terry Davis
This is a photo of Terry Davis.
Terry Davis has been the worship leader at youth events and camps all over the country. He brings an incredible energy and a contagious smile everywhere he goes. Terry has worked in ministry in churches of Christ in the Dallas and Atlanta areas and in Christian education before directing spiritually focused non-profit organizations in Georgia and Alabama.
David Kee
This is a photo of David Kee.
David Kee currently serves as assistant professor of business at the Paul R. Carter College of Business at Harding.  He teaches courses in management, economics and entrepreneurship at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Kee completed a Doctorate in Business Administration with the Grenoble Ecole de Management in Grenoble, France. In June 2016, he defended his paper-based thesis titled Ascetic Entrepreneurship: An Elite Prosopography. Kee, who was raised in Geneva, Switzerland, first owned and operated three different businesses over a period of 20 years in the upscale food industry — an import/distribution company, a consulting firm and a publication, all three based in the Atlanta area. 
Lawrence W. ("Larry") Reed
This is a photo of Larry Reed
Larry Reed became president of the Foundation for Economic Education in 2008 after serving as chairman of its board of trustees in the 1990s and both writing and speaking for FEE since the late 1970s. Prior to becoming FEE’s president, he served for 20 years as president of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy in Midland, Michigan. He also taught economics full-time from 1977 to 1984 at Northwood University in Michigan and chaired its department of economics from 1982 to 1984. He holds a B.A. in economics from Grove City College (1975) and an M.A. degree in history from Slippery Rock State University (1978), both in Pennsylvania. He holds two honorary doctorates, one from Central Michigan University (public administration, 1993) and Northwood University (laws, 2008).
Jonathan Newman
This is a photo of Jonathan Newman
Jonathan Newman is the online learning manager at the Foundation for Economic Education and an instructor of economics at Auburn University. Newman received his undergraduate degree from Samford University and received his Ph.D. in economics from Auburn University. His professional interests include macroeconomic and business cycle theory, and he enjoys teaching and analyzing divergent schools of economic thought. Newman is originally from Birmingham, Alabama, and currently lives in Auburn with his wife, Lauren, where he enjoys playing in the worship band at his church, listening to progressive rock, watching movies, and playing board games with friends. He believes this is truly the golden age of board games.
Adam MacLeod
This is a photo of Adam MacLeod
Adam MacLeod is an associate professor at Faulkner University Jones School of Law. He is a Thomas Edison Fellow in the Center for the Protection of Intellectual Property at George Mason University, a lecturer in the Witherspoon Institute’s graduate seminar on the Moral Foundations of Law, and a former visiting fellow in the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. He is author of Property and Practical Reason (Cambridge University Press, 2015), co-editor of Foundations of Law (Carolina Academic Press, 2017), and author of articles, essays, and book reviews in peer-reviewed journals and law reviews in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. He contributes to the online journals Public Discourse and Library of Law & Liberty. He previously served as law clerk for state and federal judges in Massachusetts and Colorado, as special Deputy Attorney General of Alabama, and as a lawyer in Boston. He holds degrees from Gordon College and the University of Notre Dame Law School. He lives with his wife, Katie, and their daughters in Montgomery, Alabama.

The Harding University National Leadership Forum

At the dawn of a new century, the United States has begun to look at the challenges it faces in the future. To meet these challenges American citizens must become more interested in the economic, political, and cultural principles that were the foundation of civilization in the Western Hemisphere. For more than two centuries these principles have brought to the United States the highest standard of living the world has ever known under any other political and economic system.

In this age of ideological conflict, educated citizens are indispensable. Thomas Jefferson said, "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, it expects what never was and never will be." There must be a reaffirmation and redefinition of the American heritage for each oncoming generation if the blessings of our civilization are to continue.

America can preserve her freedom only by instilling her principles and ideals into the hearts of each oncoming generation. Unless youth are taught to love American freedom and ideals, these ideals and principles that have given us the highest standard of living and the greatest measure of personal freedom will disappear.

During the 1930s in the United States, emphasis was on vocational training; in the 40s and 50s, on science; in the 70s and 80s the emphasis was on the development of an enlightened citizenry; and from the challenging 90s to the present, the emphasis must be directed to a citizenry that is responsive to the principles of democracy and willing to contribute to America's cause of freedom.

As builders of good citizenship, Civitan Clubs in Alabama and West Florida in 1956 requested that a forum be developed for youth. Since that time the seminar has grown rapidly. Students have responded so favorably that more than 200 students participate every year. Many are sponsored by civic clubs and state and county Farm Bureaus in the cooperation of Harding University's American Studies Institute.

Through the media of lectures, films, research, and association with internationally recognized authorities, we will collectively assist youth to become better acquainted with the American scene and motivated to a more forceful expression of pride in our traditions and ideals.

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